Black Swan Elena Ilinykh

Black Swan Elena Ilinykh

they’ve got the wrong tabwidth!  the right column of variables names should left-align.  probably they’re at the default, 8, while it should be 4.

they’ve got the wrong tabwidth!  the right column of variables names should left-align.  probably they’re at the default, 8, while it should be 4.

54 notes

"The header image for this article is so much win I can’t even" …
“I always knew trans-dimensional aliens were involved with the internets”

"The header image for this article is so much win I can’t even" …

I always knew trans-dimensional aliens were involved with the internets

Observer written alphabet from Fringe.  liked that show.

I just heard about the snow armageddon in Atlanta!

I just heard about the snow armageddon in Atlanta!

Glenn Arthur

Stella Im Hulberg

(Spoke / 3rd Annual Supersonic Electronic Invitational)

Simpson’s paradox

http://vudlab.com/simpsons/

In 1973, the University of California-Berkeley was sued for sex discrimination. The numbers looked pretty incriminating: the graduate schools had just accepted 44% of male applicants but only 35% of female applicants. When researchers looked at the evidence, though, they uncovered something surprising:

If the data are properly pooled…there is a small but statistically significant bias in favor of women.


James Turrell, Aten Reign
Aten Reign, the central artwork of James Turrell’s exhibition at the Guggenheim in New York this summer, is a remarkable installation that recasts the famous spiralling rotunda of the museum into something resembling the interior of a massive kaleidoscope. Through his inspired use of space and light, Turrell, an American artist who works with light as an artistic medium, asks us to slow our typical pace of viewing art such that we begin to reflect on the process of seeing itself.
Constructed from a series of white scrim cylinders hung from the atrium’s central skylight, Aten Reign has been described as a kind of stack of lampshades viewed from the inside. Each scrim ring is edged with LEDs that emit a gradually shifting spectrum of light over a 60-minute cycle. Seen from below, Aten Reign looks initially like a simple array of glowing concentric bands orbiting a central, unchanging eye. Over time, though, a creeping sensation builds that the space has a life of its own. The rings of light shimmer, expand outward, then contract. The colours ebb and flow from blazing reds, to soothing blues, to velvety purples. As the cycle fades to grey then white light, the space itself seems to drain of warmth and energy. Ghostly afterimages of intense colours flicker and skip in one’s field of vision as the cycle begins again.
By making the passage of time so pivotal in viewing his work, Turrell is extraordinarily effective in asking viewers to reflect on not just what but how we perceive. Like other works by Turrel, Aten Reign reminds us that we are active agents in constructing our visual experiences.
Photo credit: David Heald, for the Guggenheim website 
- Suzanne Hood

James Turrell, Aten Reign

Aten Reign, the central artwork of James Turrell’s exhibition at the Guggenheim in New York this summer, is a remarkable installation that recasts the famous spiralling rotunda of the museum into something resembling the interior of a massive kaleidoscope. Through his inspired use of space and light, Turrell, an American artist who works with light as an artistic medium, asks us to slow our typical pace of viewing art such that we begin to reflect on the process of seeing itself.

Constructed from a series of white scrim cylinders hung from the atrium’s central skylight, Aten Reign has been described as a kind of stack of lampshades viewed from the inside. Each scrim ring is edged with LEDs that emit a gradually shifting spectrum of light over a 60-minute cycle. Seen from below, Aten Reign looks initially like a simple array of glowing concentric bands orbiting a central, unchanging eye. Over time, though, a creeping sensation builds that the space has a life of its own. The rings of light shimmer, expand outward, then contract. The colours ebb and flow from blazing reds, to soothing blues, to velvety purples. As the cycle fades to grey then white light, the space itself seems to drain of warmth and energy. Ghostly afterimages of intense colours flicker and skip in one’s field of vision as the cycle begins again.

By making the passage of time so pivotal in viewing his work, Turrell is extraordinarily effective in asking viewers to reflect on not just what but how we perceive. Like other works by Turrel, Aten Reign reminds us that we are active agents in constructing our visual experiences.

Photo credit: David Heald, for the Guggenheim website 

- Suzanne Hood

198 notes

"Seeing and disbelieving" (New Yorker)

James Turrell is an American artist widely known for his explorations of light and space.

1,092 notes